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Briton in property dispute takes protest to Palace

Conor O’Dwyer, whose court cases in Cyprus have been dragging on for four years, is staging a four day protest outside the Presidential Palace in Nicosia.

THE bizarre twists and turns in Conor O’Dwyer’s quest for justice took a further step today when he started a protest outside the Presidential Palace in Nicosia.

Mr O’Dwyer intends to remain outside the Palace until October 4 when he is due in court to face criminal proceedings concerning allegations made on his website LyingBuilder.com. The proceedings were apparently sanctioned by the Island’s Attorney General and in a statement to this magazine, O’Conor said that he believed they were “an attempt to intimidate, silence and prevent me from pursuing my rights through the courts in Cyprus”.

O’Dwyer’s court cases against his developers have been dragging on for more than four years through the Cypriot judicial system. They resulted from a decision by the Attorney General not to start proceedings against his developers in spite of strong prima facie evidence that O’Dwyer’s developer had fraudulently sold the house he was buying for a second time.

Protests

In 2008, Mr O’Dwyer spent 74 nights sleeping rough for justice in a tiny tent outside the Cypus diplomatic mission in London; only relenting when he when he received a court date for an assault he suffered in January 2008. That case is still being heard in a Cypriot court.

He has also staged several protests at overseas property exhibitions in the UK designed to highlight his plight and to warn others of the risks of buying property in Cyprus.

Mr O’Dwyer told me that his lawyers have notified the Police and the British High Commission about his protest and that he intends to remain outside the Presidential Palace until his court case continues on Monday.

Readers' comments

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  • @houbara – I published a letter from Conor O’Dwyer earlier today – ‘Conor O’Dwyer and his quest for justice‘.

    His court cases have been dragging on for more than two years!

  • houbara says:

    Connection lawyer and developer!

    What happened to the lawyer of the concern developer?

    Is the story closed?

    Any news…???

  • @Matt – I have just been on the phone to Conor who thanks everyone for their support. He is fine, but needs a shower. He got about five hours sleep again last night.

    He is planning a YouTube video. Possibly tonight after he returns to prepare for his court case tomorrow.

    He does have a mobile phone and a laptop with him. But there isn’t a wireless hotspot otherwise he could Tweet from his mobile.

  • matt says:

    Richard – you are right in saying this forum needs to go to the next level..!!!

    Maximum exposure is needed ASAP. I’ve said this before on previous reports – Hit them where it hurts most..their pockets!

    Lets have a whip round and donate an iphone to Conor.
    He can then give everyone ‘Live’ twitter tweets and upload his videos to YouTube, Face book & Twitter.

    Nigel – can you contact Conor?

    British High & Mighty Commission…blah. Who wants to rock the boat and risk being posted back to Old Blighty! MP’s and MEP’s might help, but it’s really not on the top of their agenda…unless their is an all expenses paid trip to Cyprus of course!

    Sorry, I’m being very facetious and cynical. I must learn to be a better person.

  • Richard says:

    I’m glad he’s being looked after – and let’s not forget – not every Cypriot is a lying builder, greedy banker or apathetic public figure. Sadly – there just aren’t enough of them to make a difference.

    If I were in Cyprus now – I’d want to take photos & film a quick pavement interview with Conor and put it up on You Tube.

    At great risk of sounding like a stuck record – I’d then send it to my MEP and local UK MP. Peter (below) is right – what are the UK diplomats doing ? Maybe they all have so much inter-twined dirty linen they are frightened to stick out their necks!

    What Conor has done has relentlessly highlight not only his plight – but everyone’s plight to some degree who have ‘invested’ in property – and kept going when 99.9% of others would have given up.

    He’s an amazing guy – and I 100% support his quest for justice & exposure.

  • I’ve just had a 20 minute conversation with Conor. He got about 5 hours sleep last night and is still in good spirits.

    A number of people have been giving him food, including a Cypriot lad who was passing – and many drivers seeing Conor outside the Presidential Palace are tooting their horns in support.

    Yesterday was Independence Day and diplomats from around the world sped past Conor into the Presidential Palace. On leaving they had to drive slowly because of the road junction and many read Conor’s signs as they passed, including passengers in the President’s car.

    One car, being driven by a person involved in Conor’s case, speeded up as it drove past and almost went into the back of the car in front.

    Christos Christofides, the Director of the Office of the President, spoke with Conor and expressed his sympathy for him and his family. He asked Conor to contact him on Monday and to forward details of his case.

  • paul ruse says:

    WOW ! What a man.

    Lets be honest a good few of us would have given up and tried to get on with our lives. What Conor has done and is doing is of major benefit to all of us, and he deserves our full support.

    How he is managing to finance this himself is incredible. We should start up a fund to help the man. No one should be expected to fund and fight this unsupported.

    Perhaps, a thought, we should use their laws and take them to court and seek justice and compensation. But no one should be expected to fund that on their own. We need CPAG to organise a fighting fund. And to close Costa Apacket is right.

  • Costas Apacket says:

    You have our support Conor. Keep going.

  • Matt says:

    Hi Nigel – My comments were not directed at All Cypriots.

    I am myself half Cypriot and my wife full Cypriot. I lived in Cyprus for a few years and know how the system works (or not for some).

    My own Cyprus extended family will agree that Cyprus is not the place it once was. They themselves are very weary of doing business with Cypriots and are aware of the immense greed that has built up over the past years.

    The (Good Guys) will not get together for the simple reason that Cyprus is a very small place compared to UK. 70Million verses 750Thousand people.

    You scratch my back & I’ll scratch yours..
    Family know family know friends in places.

    I like your website and appreciate your efforts in helping to highlight the financial plight that people are faced with in Cyprus.

    Lets hope the EU can influence the Cyprus Government…but I doubt they will. Cypriots are extremely strong willed people. Once they dig their heels in, their minds are made up!

    Best Regards,
    Matt

  • Dee says:

    Poor Connor, he and his family must be so very tired of all this.

    Keep up the struggle, so many people cheering you on.

  • I spoke with Conor early this morning. He is doing well and is in good spirits. He didn’t get much sleep last night due to the work going on preparing for today’s Independence Day celebrations.

  • @Matt – Please do not tar all Cypriots with the same brush; there are many honest and decent people here.

    What surprises me is that the good guys do not get together to put an end to the deceitful practices.

  • @Peter – I visited the British High Commission earlier this week and can assure you they are not living the good life – far from it!

    Perhaps if HMG employed a team of 20 to focus on helping those with property issues, things may be different. But given the Government spending cuts, I think this unlikely.

  • Peter says:

    And what is the British High Commission doing about this?

    What a waste of time and money. Living the good life overseas, but please don’t bother us with any problems.

  • Matt says:

    “Rule, Britannia! rule the waves:
    “Britons never will be slaves.”

    These lying, cheating Cypriots will burden their children with the never ending fight for justice that their parents will leave behind!

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