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Thursday 16th July 2020
Home Letters Peyia lunacy

Peyia lunacy

We are not whingeing Brits; our Cypriot neighbours have tried the Municipality, which seems to have no power, and the Citizen’s Line, which wasn’t helpful…

Following the storms in October 2006 and their tragic consequences, the Peyia Municipality worked hard to ensure future storm water would run away harmlessly by laying drainage pipes and contouring the ravines.

The road drain across Filipos Diogenes Street was improved and two small pipes were replaced by a large one to ensure the flood of water that runs down the hill from the village like a river was diverted into a ravine.

The developers at the bottom of the ravine aesthetically made a channel with large stone banks, but now another developer is busy filling in the top section of the ravine, so where will all the water go?

Possibly, it will push the infill (consisting of earth, lumps of concrete, plastic, etc.) down the ravine and engulf the houses at the bottom with a slurry of mud similar to the one at the Corallia Beach Hotel.

Also, the ravine was green all year round and was a shelter for lizards, blackcaps, Cyprus warblers, etc.

So which lunatic gave planning permission for this? What happened to the Environmental Study which would have precluded this from happening? Does anyone care?

Bill and Maggie White
Peyia

Copyright © Cyprus Mail 2007

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