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Compensation for Pissouri homeowners

The Government has finally agreed to pay compensation to residents in Pissouri whose homes have been damaged by the landslide and to undertake a study to see if the area can be stabilised.

Cyprus: Pissouri home damaged by landslide THE GOVERNMENT is to compensate owners of homes affected by the land slippage in Pissouri, the head of the House interior committee, Andreas Kyprianou said on Monday.

The problems caused by the land slippage to residents was discussed by the committee in the presence of House President, Demetris Syllouris, who had recently visited the area and met with affected homeowners.

Following the meeting, Kyprianou said that the government has taken two political decisions; to compensate those affected by the land slippage in the Limnes area and to carry out a study on the stabilisation of the area.

“It seems that the problem is much bigger than it was initially estimated. It is a geological instability that affects the entire southwest of Pissouri,” Kyprianou said.

Kyprianou said that an amount would be given to families that had to leave their damaged homes. To date, four families have been informed that their house is inhabitable, but the number is expected to rise.

Deputies welcomed the measures announced but also criticised the government for the delay.

Greens’ MP, Giorgos Perdikis, said that the government moves at a snail’s pace. By the time measures are taken, he said, most of the buildings will have collapsed leaving scores of residents without a home.

The land slippage, which first appeared in 2012, seriously affected many houses and apartments. The affected area measures around 500 thousand square metres and is increasing. Four families have had to leave their homes.

In 2015, some of the property owners formed the Pissouri Housing Initiative Group (PHIG) and paid out thousands of euros to obtain studies and papers from various renowned international experts and also satellite imaging, at a cost of €25,000, which measures the movement of the land. According to the study, the movement is up to 40cm per year, which is a lot when it’s pressing against a house.

Damage includes cracks in interior and exterior walls, swimming pools, roads, pavements, footpaths, retaining walls, drains, water pipes and other infrastructure works.

The land slippage is due to failure to provide adequate infrastructure to manage groundwater, and allowing development to go ahead in the area. Residents blame authorities that have permitted large scale development but failed to carry out infrastructure works either to manage the groundwater, or to stabilise the sliding hillside.

Readers' comments

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  • Aggis Demetriou says:

    The government should had felt the arm of the European courts, everyone know these houses were built on a lake, the government should never had given planning permission knowing this, this is a very small area of Pissouri Village, it’s tarnished the whole area thanks to this criminal government.

    Ed: The houses WERE NOT built on a lake – this is a myth put out by the politicised media. The landslide has spread to include at least the following areas of Pissouri: Limnes, Sheromyli, Yiousouphis, Safires, Merika, Kalogeri, Merika, and Roes.

    “Limnes” also originally meant small brook or spring. There is a Limnes on mainland Greece and another in Crete; neither have lakes. The idea of a lake of 500,000 to 1,000,000 sqm on land sloping 5 to 15 degrees is ridiculous.

    I plan to publish an article later today.

  • Costas Apacket says:

    Now that the artful dodgers in Government have been forced by media coverage to issue this statement, what does it actually mean?

    Now that the house has deflected the overwhelming criticism of the media, will they offer each household 50 Euros compensation or place some other nonsensical obstacles in the way of fair recompense instead of offering what any other civilised country would offer?

    I think this saga is just beginning, because of the ‘artful dodgering’ that goes on here all of the time.

  • Deanna says:

    At last; Part 1 – the problem is officially recognised…. but how long to Part 2 ??

  • andrew michael says:

    Result….a long time coming. Details are a bit thin on compensation and what and when and how long things will take to resolve.

  • Slates says:

    If it has taken them 7 + years to acknowledge the problem how long will it take to pay?? Cyprus government is quick to take your money but not so keen when they have to pay out!

  • The views expressed in readers' comments are not necessarily shared by the Cyprus Property News.

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